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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

Deactivated WWI French Chauchat Light Machine Gun,

From Rock Island Auctions:

This is a solid example of an original WWI 1915 French “Chauchat” dewat machine gun. While called a machine gun by US terms, it is actually called an automatic rifle by the French. It was one of several type of squad level machine guns used by the French throughout WWI and was even purchased by the US Government as the model 1918 which fired the 30-06 round that employed a straight stick type magazine instead of the standard curved French model magazine. It has a very unique operating mechanism in that it has a rotating bolt or bolt head during the locking and unlocking mode similar to a Johnson rifle and can be fired in both the fully automatic and semi-automatic fashion like the Browning BAR. It operates in a direct blow back manner that uses a long-recoil type mechanism, mounted on top and to the rear of the receiver itself and is feed from a large curved type magazine fitted to the bottom of the weapon. Throughout the war it never proved itself as a very reliable machine gun as the side of the magazine, the opening for the operating rod and bolt area were all exposed to dirt and debris from the battlefields, causing it to jam often and making it not a favorite of the US forces. The left side of the receiver is marked “C.S.R.G. /134971 next to a small boxed “SA” proof indicating capture or use by the Finnish Army at some point. It has a walnut stock, pistol grip and forward support handle with a fixed front sight with a fully adjustable rear sight that has been fitted with a anti-aircraft aiming circle.

Ancient Aliens Debunked: The Nazca Lines

Some more Ancients Aliens B.S. for your viewing pleasure.

An extremely unusual custom made Savage Navy revolving rifle, circa 1860.

peashooter85:

Project HARP,
Created in 1961, Project HARP (High Altitude Reaserch Project) was a cooperative program between the US and Canadian Department of Defense to study the ballistics of rentry vehicles as a part of the space race.  For Gerald Bull, a top ballistics engineer who was a founder of the project, it was also theoretically a budget method of getting objects into outer space.  he believed that it would be much more cost effective to use large guns in order to propel objects into orbit.
The project utilitized a 16inch naval gun that was increased in length and reinforced with a special scaffolding.  Based in Barbado’s, the gun was able to fire a 180kg (about 400lb) projectile 112 miles high, a record that still stands today.  Unfortunatly the cannon was never able to fire an object into space.  At most it could propel an object up to 3,600 meters per second or about 8,000 miles per hour.  About 9,000 meters per second are required to propel in object into space.  The project was cancelled in 1967 because of budgetary cuts due to the Vietnam War.
Gerald Bull continued to work on his goal of firing an object into space.  He founded his own company, which also made artillery pieces for the military.  In the late 80’s he was hired by Saddam Hussein for Project Babylon, a program to build a super gun for Iraq.  Because of his association with Hussein, Bull was assasinated by unknown agents in 1990.

peashooter85:

Project HARP,

Created in 1961, Project HARP (High Altitude Reaserch Project) was a cooperative program between the US and Canadian Department of Defense to study the ballistics of rentry vehicles as a part of the space race.  For Gerald Bull, a top ballistics engineer who was a founder of the project, it was also theoretically a budget method of getting objects into outer space.  he believed that it would be much more cost effective to use large guns in order to propel objects into orbit.

The project utilitized a 16inch naval gun that was increased in length and reinforced with a special scaffolding.  Based in Barbado’s, the gun was able to fire a 180kg (about 400lb) projectile 112 miles high, a record that still stands today.  Unfortunatly the cannon was never able to fire an object into space.  At most it could propel an object up to 3,600 meters per second or about 8,000 miles per hour.  About 9,000 meters per second are required to propel in object into space.  The project was cancelled in 1967 because of budgetary cuts due to the Vietnam War.

Gerald Bull continued to work on his goal of firing an object into space.  He founded his own company, which also made artillery pieces for the military.  In the late 80’s he was hired by Saddam Hussein for Project Babylon, a program to build a super gun for Iraq.  Because of his association with Hussein, Bull was assasinated by unknown agents in 1990.

Ornate snaphaunce musket originating from North Africa, 19th century.

Ornate snaphaunce musket originating from North Africa, 19th century.

coffeeandspentbrass:

woesleeper:

bantarleton:

Col. Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, hand-to-hand combat expert, 1943. Known for ordering trainee Marines to attempt to kill him with bayonets, and disarming them all.

"What do we say to death?""Not today"

Here we see the Badass Motherfucker in his natural habitat.

coffeeandspentbrass:

woesleeper:

bantarleton:

Col. Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, hand-to-hand combat expert, 1943. Known for ordering trainee Marines to attempt to kill him with bayonets, and disarming them all.

"What do we say to death?"
"Not today"

Here we see the Badass Motherfucker in his natural habitat.

Silver mounted miquelet pistol produced in Brescia, Italy for the Balkan market, 19th century.

Silver mounted miquelet pistol produced in Brescia, Italy for the Balkan market, 19th century.

Scarce Bergmann Model 1897 carbine.

Estimated Value: $20,000 - $40,000

cerebralzero:

waterloowaterpark:

 Soldaat Met Zijn Vuurroer, 1600 Jacob de Gheyn

Man those are some fancy breeches and garters.
17th century fashion is my favorite.(it’s surprisingly comfy and utilitarian to wear as well)

cerebralzero:

waterloowaterpark:

 Soldaat Met Zijn Vuurroer, 1600
Jacob de Gheyn

Man those are some fancy breeches and garters.

17th century fashion is my favorite.(it’s surprisingly comfy and utilitarian to wear as well)

peashooter85:

The Soviet Invasion of Manchuria, Part V —- Surrender

In case you missed: Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV

After the initial invasion of Manchuria, Soviet forces made short work of the Kwantung Army’s first line of defense.  As per plan, the Kwantung Army withdrew to the interior of Manchuria to make their last stand.  In the meantime Soviet forces stormed into Manchuria, capturing key cities and industrial complexes across the country.  In addition, Soviet forces also invaded other Japanese held territories, such as Inner Mongolia, Korea, the Kuril Islands, and Sakhalin.

In the meantime, events were underway that would bring an eventual end to the war.  On August 6th, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima, almost completely incinerating the city.  Three days later another was dropped on Nagasaki.  Among many in the Japanese government, there was talking of accepting American unconditional surrender.  A few days later, news of the Kwantung Army’s defeat in Manchuria pushed the government even further in the directions of surrender.  On August 14th, Emperor Hirohito intervened and declared an end to the war.  Although the Emperor had little official power, most refused to ignore the will of the Emperor, who was considered an earthly god.

In Manchuria the order to surrender wasn’t fully transmitted to all units of the Kwantung Army at once.  Many Japanese soldiers surrendered, however many more continued fighting, either not receiving the order, ignoring it, or misinterpreting its vague message.  Soviet forces continued their advance, simply maneuvering around Japanese units that continued to resist while capturing important cities such a Mukhden, Qiqihar, and Changchun.  

On August 18th, the Kwantung Army officially stood down and surrendered to the Red Army.  The last Japanese forces surrendered to the Soviets on August 25th.  Overnight, the entire Kwantung Army became POW’s of the Soviet Union, altogether around 640,000 men.  Soviet forces were heavy considering the operation only involved about a weeks worth of combat.  Around 10,000 Soviets were killed in action during the campaign, as well as another 25,000 wounded.  Japanese casualties, however, were disastrous, with almost 90,000 dead by the end of the invasion.

After World War II Soviet and American tensions grew as the Cold War came into full swing.  Among the many bones of contention in the area were the division of Korea, the Soviet occupation of Japanese territories in Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands, and the Soviet Union’s support for Maoist guerrillas in China.  The Soviet occupation of Manchuria lasted until May 3rd, 1946.

The Soviet Invasion of Manchuria is over.

peashooter85:

Next round.  Remember vote for one and one only. Multiple votes will be disqualified.

Shaka Zulu

Crazy Horse

The Year of the Five Emperors (Ancient Rome)

Queen Boudicca vs. Rome

Sherman’s March

plutonialab:

Knight helmets.

A fine pair of flintlock pistols crafted by Johann Shifter, Austria circa 1720.

A fine pair of flintlock pistols crafted by Johann Shifter, Austria circa 1720.

Fun History Fact,

The Battle of Berlin began with a Soviet artillery barrage involving 22,000 artillery pieces firing around 2 million shells.  

The Soviet Invasion of Manchuria, Part V —- Surrender

In case you missed: Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV

After the initial invasion of Manchuria, Soviet forces made short work of the Kwantung Army’s first line of defense.  As per plan, the Kwantung Army withdrew to the interior of Manchuria to make their last stand.  In the meantime Soviet forces stormed into Manchuria, capturing key cities and industrial complexes across the country.  In addition, Soviet forces also invaded other Japanese held territories, such as Inner Mongolia, Korea, the Kuril Islands, and Sakhalin.

In the meantime, events were underway that would bring an eventual end to the war.  On August 6th, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima, almost completely incinerating the city.  Three days later another was dropped on Nagasaki.  Among many in the Japanese government, there was talk of accepting American unconditional surrender.  A few days later, news of the Kwantung Army’s defeat in Manchuria pushed the government even further in the directions of surrender.  On August 14th, Emperor Hirohito intervened and declared an end to the war.  Although the Emperor had little official power, most refused to ignore the will of the Emperor, who was considered an earthly god.

In Manchuria the order to surrender wasn’t fully transmitted to all units of the Kwantung Army at once.  Many Japanese soldiers surrendered, however many more continued fighting, either not receiving the order, ignoring it, or misinterpreting its vague message.  Soviet forces continued their advance, simply maneuvering around Japanese units that continued to resist while capturing important cities such a Mukhden, Qiqihar, and Changchun.  

On August 18th, the Kwantung Army officially stood down and surrendered to the Red Army.  The last Japanese forces surrendered to the Soviets on August 25th.  Overnight, the entire Kwantung Army became POW’s of the Soviet Union, altogether around 640,000 men.  Soviet forces were heavy considering the operation only involved about a weeks worth of combat.  Around 10,000 Soviets were killed in action during the campaign, as well as another 25,000 wounded.  Japanese casualties, however, were disastrous, with almost 90,000 dead by the end of the invasion.

After World War II Soviet and American tensions grew as the Cold War came into full swing.  Among the many bones of contention in the area were the division of Korea, the Soviet occupation of Japanese territories in Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands, and the Soviet Union’s support for Maoist guerrillas in China.  The Soviet occupation of Manchuria lasted until May 3rd, 1946.