">
Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

Classy cane with hidden dagger and folding trigger six shot .32 caliber revolver.  Originates from Europe, late 19th century.

Sold at Auction: $5,107.50

Fun History Fact,
Although the Western Roman Empire fell in 476 AD, the Roman Senate continued to operate until it was disestablished around 630 AD.  The Senate was revived 1144, but was disbanded by the Pope in 1193.

Fun History Fact,

Although the Western Roman Empire fell in 476 AD, the Roman Senate continued to operate until it was disestablished around 630 AD.  The Senate was revived 1144, but was disbanded by the Pope in 1193.

The Forgotten Antonine Wall,

I’m sure just about everyone has heard of the world famous “Hadrian’s Wall”, the ancient Roman wall separating iron age Scotland and Roman England which essentially served as the frontier of the Roman Empire.  However the Antonine Wall doesn’t get nearly as much press, and is largely forgotten by all except historians.

Like many emperors before him Antoninus Pius (reign 138-161) cemented his rule over the Roman people through a program of public building projects and territorial expansion.  As part of that program, Pius ordered the invasion of Southern Scotland beyond Hadrian’s Wall.  They conquered all territory up to the Scottish highlands, then set a new border complete with a new wall.  Located between the Firth of Forth and Firth of Clyde, Antonine’s Wall had the same purpose of the earlier Hadrian’s Wall; to define the border of the Roman frontier, prevent the barbarians from crossing into Roman territory, and serve as a buffer in case of invasion.  Unlike  Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall was not made entirely of stone.  Rather it was built from turf, piled upon a stone foundation and lined with stone and wood for added strength.  At the top of the wall would have been a wooden palisade, and in front of the wall was dug a large moat, as well as a series of trenches, pitfalls, and various other obstacles.  The wall itself was 10 feet high and 16 feet wide.

Altogether the Antonine Wall stretched from the North Sea to the Irish Sea, covering a total of 39 miles.  However it was not the wall by itself that kept barbarian invaders out, but the men who manned the wall.  Across the wall, spaced out at two mile intervals were 16 forts, in between which were a series of guard houses and guard towers.  In addition a number of forts were built north of the wall to protect trade routes leading to and from what the Roman’s called “Caledonia”.  To supply the defenders of the wall, and allow for a quick response in case of invasion, a 39 mile long Roman military road was built on the southern side of the wall.

The Antonine Wall took 12 years to build, but was short lived.  The Romans were never able to pacify the Caledonians, and thus the wall was under constant attack.  In 162 Emperor Marcus Aurelius ordered the wall abandoned and its legions retired to Hadrian’s Wall.  While the exact reasons behind abandoning the wall are unknown, it was most likely because the wall guarded territory that was not worth holding, in an attempt to rule over a people who had little to offer in tax revenue.  In 208 the wall was re-occupied and repaired under order of Emperor Septimus Severus.  However the new occupation was even shorter lived, only lasting a few years.

Over time the wall was deconstructed as locals used the wall for building materials.  Eventually time and the weather also wore down the turf walls into small mounds.  Today all that remains of the Antonine Wall are a line of mounds, trenches, and stone foundations, as well as the remains of Roman forts.  

A set of gold damascened percussion pistols crafted by Eusebio Zuloaga, Eibar or Madrid, Spain circa 1847-55.

A set of gold damascened percussion pistols crafted by Eusebio Zuloaga, Eibar or Madrid, Spain circa 1847-55.

The Sjogren Inertia Semi-Automatic Shotgun,

One of the first semi-automatic shotguns invented, the unique Sjogren was the creation of Swedish inventor Carl Axel Theodor Sjogren.  Unlike most if not all other longarms, the Sjogren used what is essentially a recoil operated slide, like on a modern semi-automatic pistol.  When fired, recoil from the discharge would force the slide back, which traveled on a set of rails.  When the slide was forced back, the empty shell was ejected and a new shell was loaded from its five round tubular magazine.  

Originally the Sjogren was designed as a .30 caliber military rifle, and submitted to the British Army as well as other militaries.  All rejected the design, seeing it as too complex, as well as too costly.  Without being able to secure a military contract, Sjogren focused on producing shotguns using his inertia system.  Between 1908 and 1909 around 5,000 Sjogren shotguns were produced by the Danish firm Haandvaabenverksäderna.  Unfortunately the design never took off, mostly due to price, as the Sjogren cost substantially more than the common double barrel or pump action shotgun.

An engraved and decorated Colt Model 1851 single action percussion revolver with detachable buttstock.

Engraving and decoration by Nickolai Goltyakov of the Tula Armory, Russia, mid 19th century.


Posthumous Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Kleber - Adele de Kercado (1830)

Posthumous Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Kleber - Adele de Kercado (1830)

mediumaevum:

  1. Ottonian crown on display at Essen’s cathedral treasury, ca. 1100. Long believed to be the infant crown of king of Romans Otto III
  2. Long called the Crown of St. Louis and thought to have been made in Paris, the Crown of Liège, acquired by the Louvre in 1947, is now known to be a Mosan piece (late 13th century)
  3. Crown of Elizabeth Kotromanic (born ca. 1339) in Zadar, given by Louis I of Hungary
ancientart:

Golden amphora, 4th century BCE. Part of the Panagyurishte Treasure, this extraordinary Thracian artefact was uncovered accidentally in 1949 by three brothers who were digging for clay to make bricks. Note the centaur-shaped handles.
Courtesy of & currently located at the National Historical Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.

ancientart:

Golden amphora, 4th century BCE. Part of the Panagyurishte Treasure, this extraordinary Thracian artefact was uncovered accidentally in 1949 by three brothers who were digging for clay to make bricks. Note the centaur-shaped handles.

Courtesy of & currently located at the National Historical Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.

An ornate silver mounted double barrel flintlock rifle signed Charles Simon.  Charles Simon was the master gunsmith for King Louis XVI from 1765 to 1796.

A political cartoon entitled “The Political Clyster”. Published by Robert Sayer circa 1757.

A political cartoon entitled “The Political Clyster”. Published by Robert Sayer circa 1757.

peashooter85:

Louis XIV —- The Enema King,

(note; this is not a joke, this is historical fact)

In the 16th to 19th century a clyster was an early form of enema administered with a device called a “clyster”, essentially a large syringe which was inserted … you know where.  For millenia regular colon cleansing was a staple of medicine going back to ancient times.  Even the ancient Egyptians hired a special physician called the “Guardian of the Anus” to administer colon cleansing to the Pharaoh.  By the Middle Ages the administration of enemas became a staple among physicians, almost as popular as bloodletting. However the people of 17th century France would take the clyster to a whole new level.

In pre-revolutionary France clyster mania spread across the country’s upper class.  Clysters were administered daily to maintain good health, sometimes being administered multiple times a day, and often containing various herbs and fragrances.  They even became as fashion statement as ladies had regular clysters as a way to preserve beauty and youth.  According to the Duc de Saint-Simon the Duchess of Bourgogne was known to take clysters during parties, often conversing with the king, “while her loyal maid crawled beneath her bejewelled evening gown to administer an enema.”  For such public lavements special clyster syringes were designed with special butt concealment plates.  Curved syringes were also created for those who wanted to self administer, forgoing the need of a servant.

One of the biggest fans of the regular colon cleansing was King Louis XIV. Known as “The Sun King”, Loius XIV installed absolute monarchy in France and was the most powerful man in Europe at the time.  At first Louis XIV would enjoy a once and a while clyster, usually administered after dinner to aid digestion.  However as his reign continued on the King was known to have around three or four clysters a day. His favorite lavement was a mixture of almond oil, honey, and lentitive electuary (a laxative). Being a king who had to manage a powerful empire with limited time, eventually Loius XIV began taking clysters while conferring with government ministers and advisers. Throughout his long reign King Louis XIV recieved in excess of 2,000 clyters.

Calmative Lavement for the King, 1652

30 grammes oil of almond

45 grammes honey

15 grammes lentitive electuary

Mix with warm water.

source

A special lot featuring a flintlock musket and pair of swords, all originating from 19th century Indochina (Southeast Asia).
Sold at auction for only:  €250

A special lot featuring a flintlock musket and pair of swords, all originating from 19th century Indochina (Southeast Asia).

Sold at auction for only:  €250

Replica Colt Model 1851 Dragoon single action revolver presented to the Russian Czar and Ottoman Emperor.

In the 1854 Samuel Colt center picture) ordered the production of two heavily decorated Colt Model 1851 Dragoon single action revolvers, which were decorated by master engraver Alvin A. White.  Each revolver featured a portrait of George Washington on the cylinder and the Marquis de Lafeyette on the frame.  Each were heavily decorated with gold inlays and intricate scroll work engraving.  One was presented to Sultan Abdulmecid I, Emperor of the Ottoman Empire (left picture) and Czar Alexander II, Emperor of Russia.  Both leaders were adversaries during the Crimean War, and the purpose of the gifts were to celebrate the end of the war.

The revolver gifted to Abdulmecid II is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Ornate contemporary made flintlock pistol crafted by J.W. Huddleston of JWH Engraving.

http://www.jwh-flintlocks.net/