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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History
Peashooter recommends —- An excellent book to read,

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The Diving Bell and the Butterfly by Jean-Dominique Bauby

In 1995 French writer and journalist Jean-Dominique Bauby suffered a massive stroke which left him afflicted with “locked in syndrome”.  Trapped in his own body, he was only able to blink his left eye.  Over time a communication technique was developed where a certain number of blinks represented a letter of the alphabet.  Between 1995 and 1997 Bauby wrote “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly” in his head, then dictated it a letter at a time.  The book details his life, trapped in his own body, unable to move, and being completely helpless in the care of others. For example in one chapter he describes the madness of having a fly on his nose, but not being able to brush it off. 

"The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" was published in 1997. Sadly Jean-Dominque Bauby died ten days later due to complications from his affliction.

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As a mostly gun related blog author what is your first hand level of experience with guns? Are you a collector or have access to a collection? Current or former military or law enforcement? Wikipedia and video games?
Anonymous

I am the son a of gunsmith, my dad has a huge collection of antiques, vintage, and sporting firearms. I’m also a hunter and recreational shooter. I’ve never been in the military, nor do I play a lot of video games. On a related note I was a former history teacher, hence why I do a lot of history and historic firearms.  Now in training to become a respiratory therapist.

spaceflightzero answered your post: Right now I’m creating posts to be sch…

Whats your favorite berry?

Blue Berry

Where do those people come from and what in the world makes them think that yours is exclusively a gun blog

well, I do post a lot of guns

I really appreciate your blog.You aren't all "MANLY GUNS ONLY MANLY GUNS BIG GUNS THAT ARE MANLY AND HAIRY AND GGIRIRHEIHQAIFHAEIFBISBGIK MANLY". You have an actual knowledge of guns and their history. And it's nice.

Showing off one of my MANLY GUNS!!!!

zorro-royal answered your post: Right now I’m creating posts to be sch…

how do you work an extractor rod if the cylinder doesn’t swing out?

I assume you’re refering to those old revolvers with a loading gate, typically single action?  Its pretty simple. First cock the hammer to half cock, that should allow the cylinder to spin freely.   Then open the loading gate, and align the extracting rod with the chamber.  Then insert the rod into the chamber, which should bump out the cartridge or empty casing.  

Regular or curly fries?

curly, with melted cheddar

Regular or sweet potato fries??

I actually don’t like sweet potato too much. So regular.

Why did bolt action rifles achieve more permanence than their lever action counterparts?

1. Compared to bolt actions, lever action mechanisms are relatively complex and fragile.

2. Lever actions often could not fire high powered “express” hunting loads.  While John Browning designed some express lever actions, they were no where near the quality of express bolt action rifles.

3. Since most lever actions used a tube magazine, with the bullet pointing at the primer of the cartridge ahead of it, most lever actions could not use spitzer bullet (pointed bullet) cartridges.  There were exceptions.

4. Its hard to work a lever action while prone, while easy to do with a bolt action.

5. Bolt actions could use stripper and en bloc clips for fast reloading.  With a few exceptions, lever actions could not.

How do you prefer to season your grilled chicken?

Marinated in teriyaki

Hey uncle peashooter do you mind doing a post on Ayn Rand's philosophy of utilitarianism vs. Kant's version? I only ask because it seems like you'd give an honest unbiased post.

I don’t think so, I don’t really know that much about philosophy and such things are out of my league.  Plus I don’t really like Ayn Rand that much.  Not because of her philosophy which I don’t really have an opinion on.  I just don’t think she was that great of a writer.

Why aren't there more double barrel bolt-action rifles? I know there are some, but the only guy that I know makes them CUSTOM makes them so it takes a long time and is quite expensive.

Probably because its much more complex of a mechanism, which requires more skill, time, and of course money and resources to produce.  Plus it just seems kind of frivolous and unnecessary to me, more like a novelty than a practical rifle.  A good old regular bolt action rifle is much cheaper, easier to use and maintain, and much more accurate.

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peashooter85:

Lord Cromwell, Warts and All
Many may remember this expression, usually used to bring notice to the less attractive aspect of a figure.  For example; “John F. Kennedy serves as  a shining example of the great American president, but when you look at his life 'warts and all' you will find that he was also a womanizer and adulterer.”
Many may not know it, but this phrase has deep historical roots that go back centuries to the English Civil War in the mid 1600’s.  During the English Civil War there was a great conflict over what the official religion should be.  The English Parliament were mostly Puritans who wanted religious worship to be simple and without frills.  King Charles I and his royalists were Anglicans, head of the Church of England which held masses steeped in ceremony and tradition.
After much violence and bloodshed the Parliamentarians, under the command of Gen. Oliver Cromwell, overthrew and executed King Charles I.  They named Cromwell Lord Protector, who would later have the powers of a military dictator and mold England into a strict Puritan theocracy.
In 1656 the artist Samuel Cooper was called upon to paint the portrait of Oliver Cromwell.  Cromwell was no handsome man, rather a ruff and gruff looking man with a face covered with warts and blemishes.  Great rulers of the time always wanted their portraits to depict them as being incredibly dignified, almost saintly, dare I say magnificent people. Cromwell was a staunch Puritan, a fierce opponent of anything seen to be vain or idolatrous and did not want such an embellished representation of himself.
When Cooper was called upon to paint the portrait of Oliver Cromwell, Cromwell ordered him to paint his face as is, warts and all.

peashooter85:

Lord Cromwell, Warts and All

Many may remember this expression, usually used to bring notice to the less attractive aspect of a figure.  For example; “John F. Kennedy serves as  a shining example of the great American president, but when you look at his life 'warts and all' you will find that he was also a womanizer and adulterer.”

Many may not know it, but this phrase has deep historical roots that go back centuries to the English Civil War in the mid 1600’s.  During the English Civil War there was a great conflict over what the official religion should be.  The English Parliament were mostly Puritans who wanted religious worship to be simple and without frills.  King Charles I and his royalists were Anglicans, head of the Church of England which held masses steeped in ceremony and tradition.

After much violence and bloodshed the Parliamentarians, under the command of Gen. Oliver Cromwell, overthrew and executed King Charles I.  They named Cromwell Lord Protector, who would later have the powers of a military dictator and mold England into a strict Puritan theocracy.

In 1656 the artist Samuel Cooper was called upon to paint the portrait of Oliver Cromwell.  Cromwell was no handsome man, rather a ruff and gruff looking man with a face covered with warts and blemishes.  Great rulers of the time always wanted their portraits to depict them as being incredibly dignified, almost saintly, dare I say magnificent people. Cromwell was a staunch Puritan, a fierce opponent of anything seen to be vain or idolatrous and did not want such an embellished representation of himself.

When Cooper was called upon to paint the portrait of Oliver Cromwell, Cromwell ordered him to paint his face as is, warts and all.

Right now I’m creating posts to be scheduled for when I’m gone thursday and friday.

Any one have any questions, which I will answer when i am done?

peashooter85:

The History of Oliver Cromwell’s Head,

The most powerful man in English history, Oliver Cromwell is remembered for overthrowing King Charles I during the English Civil War, becoming England’s all powerful Lord Protector, and conducting a bloody conquest of Ireland.  However, one part of history forgotten to the masses is what happened to Cromwell’s head after his death.  In 1658 Oliver Cromwell died, leaving the office of Lord Protector to his son, Richard Cromwell.  Richard Cromwell did not have the charisma or experience to handle the complicated affairs of the English state and hold the Cromwellian Empire together.  He stepped down in 1659, the Cromwellian government collapsed, and King Charles II was recalled from exile to rule England.

Public favor quickly shifted away from Cromwell and the former parliamentarians.  In 1660 Cromwell’s corpse was disinterred from its grave and subjected to a “posthumous execution” by hanging.  His head was removed from his corpse and placed on a 20 ft pole above Westminster Hall.  In the late 1680’s a storm threw the head to the ground, where it was stolen by a guard who hid it in his house for several decades.  In 1710 the former guard then sold it to Caldius Du Puy, a Swiss antiquities collector who owned a private museum in London.  Cromwell’s head became the star attraction of the museum, earning Du Puy a large sum of wealth.  After Du Puy’s death the head passed to a number of collectors who tried to display the head for profit.  Each was a failure due to the fact that Cromwell’s head was no longer looked upon with a sense of infamy, but as a minor curiosity akin to a carnival sideshow.  

By 1900 there were questions as to the authenticity of the head, as the head had passed through the hands of many shady people throughout its history.  In 1911 the head was in the possession of Horace Wilkinson when it was subjected to examination by the scientist Karl Pearson and anthropologist Geoffrey Morant.  In a 109 page report they detailed how they compared the structures of the head’s skull with the shape of Cromwell’s face and head based off of period portraits and Cromwell’s death mask.  By the end of the report Pearson and Morant concluded that there was a “moral certainty” that the head did indeed once belong to Oliver Cromwell.

When Horace Wilkinson died in 1957 the head passed into the possession of his son, Horace Wilkinson Jr.  However Wilkinson chose to finally put the head to rest after almost three centuries of handling by the living.  In 1960 the head was interned in an unknown location near the antechapel of Sidney Sussex College.  Today a plaque commemorates the general area where the head currently rests.  The location of Cromwell’s body is unknown to this day.