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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

Rare Colt Root Model 1855 revolving percussion 10 gauge shotgun.

Estimated Value: $8,500 - $11,000

lightning-st0rm:

pearlmito:

smootymormonhelldream:

stripedsilverfeline:

anti-clerical:

ramirezbundydahmer:

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

This should be required learning, internationally. 

You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten. 
Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now. 
Make it stop? 

I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling.

My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable. 

I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them.

lightning-st0rm:

pearlmito:

smootymormonhelldream:

stripedsilverfeline:

anti-clerical:

ramirezbundydahmer:

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

This should be required learning, internationally. 

You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten. 

Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now. 

Make it stop

I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling.

My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable. 

I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:


The Secret History of the Great Penguin War of 1912
No one knows when Penguinstan (Antarctica) first colonized the coastal regions of South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, but they had long established dominance before the arrival of Europeans. The Dutch, arriving in South Africa in the 17th century had established good relationships with the Penguin colonists and through friendly negotiations had worked out an amiable way to share power, and the two lived relatively harmoniously. The British however were unwilling to seek compromises.
The first real conflict occurred with a small naval encounter between Captain Cook and a small fleet of Penguinstani Warbergs. Although they possessed limited experience in their function from interactions with the Dutch, the Penguins had not yet adopted gunpowder weapons, and were beaten off easily by the British ship. British-Penguin relations would only go downhill from there, with the invasion of Australia and the Battle of Botany Bay on January 25th, 1788.  Britain quickly expanded its hold over the continent, beating back ineffective Penguin guerrilla attacks, and seeing the ease with which they had conquered the region, set their sights on the crown jewel of the Penguinstani Empire, the Cape region of South Africa, taking it with minimal resistance from the outgunned Penguins, who were forced to sign the humiliating Treaty of Cape Town in 1809, which stripped the Penguin residents of all British holdings of almost all their rights.
The 19th century saw a marked decline in conflict between the two sides, but the Penguins, while on the surface accepting the status quo, were secretly building up their forces in Penguinstan, waiting for the next confrontation with the British Empire, and their chance to reclaim what they saw as rightfully theirs. Although they technically declared neutrality, it was suspected that Penguins were heavily involved in the Second Boer War, and at least one company of volunteers is known to have been present at the Siege of Ladysmith.
It was Robert Scott who eventually gave the Penguins the excuse they were looking for. The one concession the Penguins had been able to get from the British in 1809 was the assurance that the sovereignty of and border security Penguinstan would not be violated, yet determined to beat Amundsen to the South Pole – the Norwegian had reached an amicable agreement with the Penguins prior to launching his trek, paying them a hefty fee of herring – Scott refused to meet any of the Penguin demands, and set off on his expedition without their permission. Lacking the assistance of the Penguins that Amundsen received, and harried by guerrilla attacks for much of the way, Scott reached the Pole second (According to Penguin historians, Emperor Sphenis IX made sure that Scott would reach the destination so as to know he had been beaten there), and on the return trek, he and his party were slaughtered to a man by a Penguin commando.
With a clear cassus belli, the Penguins declared war and launched a Warberg which traveled north through the Atlantic, interdicting the newly launched ocean liner, the HMS Titanic and sinking it. This was soon followed up with the assassination of Field Marshal Sir George White, who although elderly was the only British commander with experience fighting Penguins, having faced them at Ladysmith. Unable to engage in conventional warfare, the Penguins raided British shipping, with the notable success in sinking the Calvados, and commando raids in South Africa led to passage of the Native Land Act of 1913 as the ruling Whites feared that continued Penguin successes might embolden the already subjugated African population.
The British scored a somewhat successful victory with the invasion force of Penguinstan led by the Australian Douglas Mawson, but despite defeating multiple Penguin forces sent against them, they lacked the manpower to hold their gains and were forced to withdraw by 1914, giving up the toehold they had managed to hold.
There is no telling how long the war might have gone for if it wasn’t for the outbreak of World War I. Knowing that they couldn’t fight both the Central Powers and the Penguins at once, Britain had no choice but to sue for peace. The Cape Town Treaty was thrown out, and a new agreement negotiated, the Weddell Sea Treaty of 1914, which was signed on September 17th, officially ending hostilities. In exchange for recognizing Crown control over South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the Falklands, as well as the British right to establish non-military installations in the coastal region of the Weddell Sea for scientific research, the British agreed to recognize the rights of Penguin residents of areas under their control, and the right of the Penguins to govern their own domestic affairs, similar to the designation of American Indian tribes as “domestic dependent nations”. Additionally, Penguins were given the right to their own border controls in regards to travel between Penguinstan and the Crown lands.
This wasn’t truly the end though. Bitter animosity remained. Ernest Shackleton, who had been organizing a new military strike into the heart of Penguinstan refused to accept the end of the war and continued with his expedition, only to have his ship destroyed by Penguin Warbergs. It took great diplomatic pressure from the Norwegians and the Dutch – who had always maintained excellent relations with Penguinstan – to ensure the safe passage of his crew and for the Penguins not to resume the war. And of course, while the German overtures didn’t induce Emperor Sphenis IX to join the Central Powers, he was quite willing to send Penguin advisers to assist the Kaiserliche Marine, where their expertise in naval raids saw the German U-boat fleet become a force to be feared.
With the conclusion of the Great Penguin War of 1912, no major hostilities have erupted between the two powers, although minor skirmishes have resulted between researchers and Penguin extremists who resent any presence of British in Penguinstan. And of course a small contingent of Penguin Nationalists who hoped for the return of the Falklands to Penguin control assisted the Argentinians during the Falklands War, but their involvement was vociferously objected to by Emperor Foster XXIII, who arrested and executed them upon their return to Penguinstan, and this there was no negative consequences with the UK, although it is suspected that they had provided the intelligence that resulted in the sinking of the HMS Sheffield.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

The Secret History of the Great Penguin War of 1912

No one knows when Penguinstan (Antarctica) first colonized the coastal regions of South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, but they had long established dominance before the arrival of Europeans. The Dutch, arriving in South Africa in the 17th century had established good relationships with the Penguin colonists and through friendly negotiations had worked out an amiable way to share power, and the two lived relatively harmoniously. The British however were unwilling to seek compromises.

The first real conflict occurred with a small naval encounter between Captain Cook and a small fleet of Penguinstani Warbergs. Although they possessed limited experience in their function from interactions with the Dutch, the Penguins had not yet adopted gunpowder weapons, and were beaten off easily by the British ship. British-Penguin relations would only go downhill from there, with the invasion of Australia and the Battle of Botany Bay on January 25th, 1788.  Britain quickly expanded its hold over the continent, beating back ineffective Penguin guerrilla attacks, and seeing the ease with which they had conquered the region, set their sights on the crown jewel of the Penguinstani Empire, the Cape region of South Africa, taking it with minimal resistance from the outgunned Penguins, who were forced to sign the humiliating Treaty of Cape Town in 1809, which stripped the Penguin residents of all British holdings of almost all their rights.

The 19th century saw a marked decline in conflict between the two sides, but the Penguins, while on the surface accepting the status quo, were secretly building up their forces in Penguinstan, waiting for the next confrontation with the British Empire, and their chance to reclaim what they saw as rightfully theirs. Although they technically declared neutrality, it was suspected that Penguins were heavily involved in the Second Boer War, and at least one company of volunteers is known to have been present at the Siege of Ladysmith.

It was Robert Scott who eventually gave the Penguins the excuse they were looking for. The one concession the Penguins had been able to get from the British in 1809 was the assurance that the sovereignty of and border security Penguinstan would not be violated, yet determined to beat Amundsen to the South Pole – the Norwegian had reached an amicable agreement with the Penguins prior to launching his trek, paying them a hefty fee of herring – Scott refused to meet any of the Penguin demands, and set off on his expedition without their permission. Lacking the assistance of the Penguins that Amundsen received, and harried by guerrilla attacks for much of the way, Scott reached the Pole second (According to Penguin historians, Emperor Sphenis IX made sure that Scott would reach the destination so as to know he had been beaten there), and on the return trek, he and his party were slaughtered to a man by a Penguin commando.

With a clear cassus belli, the Penguins declared war and launched a Warberg which traveled north through the Atlantic, interdicting the newly launched ocean liner, the HMS Titanic and sinking it. This was soon followed up with the assassination of Field Marshal Sir George White, who although elderly was the only British commander with experience fighting Penguins, having faced them at Ladysmith. Unable to engage in conventional warfare, the Penguins raided British shipping, with the notable success in sinking the Calvados, and commando raids in South Africa led to passage of the Native Land Act of 1913 as the ruling Whites feared that continued Penguin successes might embolden the already subjugated African population.

The British scored a somewhat successful victory with the invasion force of Penguinstan led by the Australian Douglas Mawson, but despite defeating multiple Penguin forces sent against them, they lacked the manpower to hold their gains and were forced to withdraw by 1914, giving up the toehold they had managed to hold.

There is no telling how long the war might have gone for if it wasn’t for the outbreak of World War I. Knowing that they couldn’t fight both the Central Powers and the Penguins at once, Britain had no choice but to sue for peace. The Cape Town Treaty was thrown out, and a new agreement negotiated, the Weddell Sea Treaty of 1914, which was signed on September 17th, officially ending hostilities. In exchange for recognizing Crown control over South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the Falklands, as well as the British right to establish non-military installations in the coastal region of the Weddell Sea for scientific research, the British agreed to recognize the rights of Penguin residents of areas under their control, and the right of the Penguins to govern their own domestic affairs, similar to the designation of American Indian tribes as “domestic dependent nations”. Additionally, Penguins were given the right to their own border controls in regards to travel between Penguinstan and the Crown lands.

This wasn’t truly the end though. Bitter animosity remained. Ernest Shackleton, who had been organizing a new military strike into the heart of Penguinstan refused to accept the end of the war and continued with his expedition, only to have his ship destroyed by Penguin Warbergs. It took great diplomatic pressure from the Norwegians and the Dutch – who had always maintained excellent relations with Penguinstan – to ensure the safe passage of his crew and for the Penguins not to resume the war. And of course, while the German overtures didn’t induce Emperor Sphenis IX to join the Central Powers, he was quite willing to send Penguin advisers to assist the Kaiserliche Marine, where their expertise in naval raids saw the German U-boat fleet become a force to be feared.

With the conclusion of the Great Penguin War of 1912, no major hostilities have erupted between the two powers, although minor skirmishes have resulted between researchers and Penguin extremists who resent any presence of British in Penguinstan. And of course a small contingent of Penguin Nationalists who hoped for the return of the Falklands to Penguin control assisted the Argentinians during the Falklands War, but their involvement was vociferously objected to by Emperor Foster XXIII, who arrested and executed them upon their return to Penguinstan, and this there was no negative consequences with the UK, although it is suspected that they had provided the intelligence that resulted in the sinking of the HMS Sheffield.

A miquelet pistol decorated with gold plated silver mounting.  Originates from Sardinia, late 18th century.

A miquelet pistol decorated with gold plated silver mounting.  Originates from Sardinia, late 18th century.

historical-nonfiction:

Barrels of alcohol to burned during Prohibition (1924)

historical-nonfiction:

Barrels of alcohol to burned during Prohibition (1924)

Attractive silver barreled gilt frame Moore First Model Derringer.

Included on the handle of the pistol is an American eagle with shield engraving.  Many sources believe this design was a special presentation design for pistols intended to be used a political gifts for politicians, with the intent of driving up sales among the military, police, and militia.

Estimated Value: $2,500 - $4,000

Pat a Pan by Manheim Steamroller

Sleigh Ride by Leroy Anderson

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

To all my followers, a Merry Christmas/Saturnalia/Festivus/Kwanza/Winter Solstice/Christmahanakwanzika/Sol Invictus/Yule/Donghzi/Newtonmas/Yalda/Advent/Chalica/Soyal//Pansha Ganapati/Malkh/Krampusnacht/Pancha Ganapati/Boxing Day/Mōdraniht/Secular Federal Holiday, and a belated Hanukah greeting as well!

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

To all my followers, a Merry Christmas/Saturnalia/Festivus/Kwanza/Winter Solstice/Christmahanakwanzika/Sol Invictus/Yule/Donghzi/Newtonmas/Yalda/Advent/Chalica/Soyal//Pansha Ganapati/Malkh/Krampusnacht/Pancha Ganapati/Boxing Day/Mōdraniht/Secular Federal Holiday, and a belated Hanukah greeting as well!

Happy Spaghetti Monster Day to all my Atheist followers

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Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, Happy New Year to all my followers.
Hi, I’m just passing by for a warmy hello, and I wish you a happy Xmas!!!Hugs and kisses!! ;)

:D Thank you, merry Christmas!!!

Beware ecampus and freeshipping.com

THEY ARE FRAUDS!!!!

I rented textbooks from ecampus last semester.  Just this night I noticed a weird charge on my bank account for $12.97 by a company called freeshipping.com.  It turns out they have been charging me for their “services” since September.  I only caught it now.  

It turns out that when I signed up for ecampus I also signed up for freeshipping.com. I have no idea how they did this. I just called them and had them cancel that service, demanded all my money back (which they denied), then called them a bunch pigf&$#ing bastards.

After Christmas I am going to go to my bank and stop charges to them just for good measure, contest charges, file a fraud report, and notify the authorities.  I am also going to call ecampus as they have some ‘splainin to do.

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adrianianam replied to your post: If I were Smaug and wanted to create u…

That would probably just force the Middle Earth states to adopt currencies that aren’t backed by commodities. Though I imagine the premature rise of fiat currency might be problematic in it’s own way.

HobBitcoins

If I were Smaug and wanted to cause untold death and destruction, I would have just flown around and given away all that treasure. It would have led to rampant hyperinflation, sky high interest rates, and would have completely devastated the economy of Middle Earth.

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