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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History
I remember watching an episode of the Sharpe's TV series where one of the readcoats was able to fire 4 or 5 rounds per minute from the Brown Bess musket - do you think that would be really possible?

For a well trained, well disciplined, and well seasoned soldier that was possible.  But it would have been the outer limit of what was possible and usually only accomplished by the most battle hardened elite units.  Most conscript or volunteer soldiers thrust into combat at the time probably fired around two shots a minute.  Some might make 3.  It just depends on the skill and experience of the individual unit.

What is your favourite rifle from WW1?

Probably the Lee Enfield.  In any type of warzone where bolt actions dominate I would want that ten round magazine with quick working action.

Post about early revolvers.

17th century Wheel-lock revolver.  Pretty early, huh!

I am so unfocused tonight I literally cannot decide what I want to post! Call for questions!?

Since I ain’t getting much done tonight, anyone have an questions?

Do you have a favorite .22 pistol or rifle?
Anonymous

I have an H&R 949 .22 double action revolver that I have been shooting since I was a kid.  Really accurate, great for small game hunting.

Rare experimental Mauser Norris bolt action single shot rifle, late 1860’s.

Estimated Value: $3,500 - $6,500

The Mammoth Cheese

historybizarre:

On January 29th, the White House is holding a “Big Block of Cheese Day,” inspired by an episode of the West Wing, which in turn tells the story of Andrew Jackson’s very large block of cheese. 

But Jackson’s was not the first giant cheese in the White House. In fact, it was created in echo of a cheese made for Thomas Jefferson. 

Jefferson’s Mammoth Cheese was presented to him by the town of Cheshire, MA, the brainchild of Elder John Leland. It arrived in Washington on December 29, 1801, and was presented to the President in ceremony on New Year’s Day 1802. That day, Jefferson wrote to his son-in-law Thomas Mann Randolph “the Mammoth cheese is arrived here and is to be presented this day. it is 4 f 4 1/2 I. diameter, 15. I. thick, and weighted in August 1230 lb.” (Letter at Library of Congress) Because Jefferson had a policy of not accepting gifts, he paid Leland $200 for the cheese. It lasted until at least 1804, when it was well past being edible.

The Mammoth Cheese that Leo talks about in the West Wing episode was commissioned by supporters of President Andrew Jackson, who believed that Jackson deserved every honor which had been given Jefferson (see Kate Beaton’s hilarious take on this, and Jackson more generally.) A man from New York state, Mr. Meacham, organized a new mammoth cheese, which was cut into at a public reception at the White House on February 1837. According to one report, it weighed 1,400 lbs. The cheese-cutting was one of the last receptions of Jackson’s presidency; he stepped down on March 4 of that year.

image

This image from Perley’s Reminiscences of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis Vol. I (Philadelphia, 1886) shows the people cutting into Jackson’s cheese. 

James Reid Patent .22 caliber knuckle duster revolver, manfuactured between 1862 and 1882.
Sold at Auction: $1,000

James Reid Patent .22 caliber knuckle duster revolver, manfuactured between 1862 and 1882.

Sold at Auction: $1,000

messytimetravel:

1882 : 1882: Patent rat exterminator Curated by Amanda Uren

messytimetravel:

1882 : 1882: Patent rat exterminator
Curated by Amanda Uren

joshuafountain:

Night Watchman

joshuafountain:

Night Watchman

yourfutureleader:

dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

Ah yes, a friendly reminder of why you shouldn’t stand in front of a musket even if we’re ‘only’ shooting with black powder.

yourfutureleader:

dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

Ah yes, a friendly reminder of why you shouldn’t stand in front of a musket even if we’re ‘only’ shooting with black powder.

A double barrel percussion pistol with folding knife. Belgian, mid 19th century.

The Habsburg Bunch
 ♫There’s a story, of an inbred family, and they ruled Europe for two hundred years… ♪♬

The Habsburg Bunch

 There’s a story, of an inbred family, and they ruled Europe for two hundred years… 

It’s not about the money, it’s a matter of principle! —- Brown vs. Legal Foundation of Washington (2003)

When it comes to hiring an attorney it is not uncommon for the client to pay a retainer.  When this is done the client pays the money up front, but the attorney doesn’t get the money until his legal services are concluded.  In the meantime the money is deposited in a temporary account.  Since the money can sit in the account for as little as a few days, banks will not pay interest on retainer fees. 

In the 1980’s and 90’s state bar associations began to institute IOLTA accounts (interest on lawyer trust accounts).  Instead of various attorneys depositing their retainers fees in individual accounts, they could collectively deposit their retainers in an IOLTA account owned by the state bar association.  Since money was constantly withdrawn and deposited, this allowed for the account to have a regular balance with which the bank could pay interest on.  Money raised from the interest was used to provide free legal services to the poor.

A Washington attorney named Allen D. Brown believed that it was unconstitutional for the state to take that money, but that the interest raised was his, and that taking the money was an infringement of his 5th Amendment Rights.  In 2003 he brought a lawsuit against the Legal Foundation of Washington to the Supreme Court of the United States over interest accrued on his retainer fees.  Keep in mind that to get to the Supreme Court, he had to take his suit through the Washington State courts, appeals court, Washington State Supreme Court, Federal District Court, and Federal Appeals Court.  So how much money was at stake that Brown was willing to navigate the entire US court system?  Drum roll please —- $4.96.  Not even enough to buy a five dollar foot long.

SCOTUS ruled against Brown in a 5 to 4 decision.  The majority opinion was that the state didn’t take anything from him since he could not have earned the interest on the private market.  Without intervention of IOLTA, the interest would have never been raised in the first place. It wouldn’t even have existed.  Bummer for Brown.

On a related note Judge Judy once threw out a case with damages amounting to $25, citing that it was a waste of her time.

A flintlock candle lighter, mid 19th century Europe.

A flintlock candle lighter, mid 19th century Europe.