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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History
Rare Collier flintlock revolver, circa 1820.
Estimated Value: $30,000 - $45,000

Rare Collier flintlock revolver, circa 1820.

Estimated Value: $30,000 - $45,000

I have a sundial cannon replica that was used for display advertising by the Hamilton Watch Co,. It is in a wooded box marked 8 of 150 made for transporting it and it has "rosseau" engraved on one side and "fecit a paris" on the other. The piece itself appears to be cast metal but with the aging it is hard to tell. It has mounted legs on each side of the sundial for the magnifing glass to be mounted and the small cannon beneath it sitting on the sundial. Who can handle this for me?
Anonymous

WOW THAT IS COOL!!!!  WHAT AN AWESOME PIECE!!!!  

What do you mean by “who can handle this for me?”  Do you mean you wish to sell it?  Unfortunately my expertise is antique firearms.  This goes beyond antique firearms as it can be an item for vintage a rare clock/watch collectos and is probably not something most firearms enthusiasts would be interested in.

This is cool because it has Hamilton Watch Company, which makes very fine timepieces, but was probably contracted from Europe.  Who knows how much it is worth?  My first step would be to consult some professional appraisers, especially someone with an expertise in timepieces.  Heck get second opinions as well.  

If its not worth so much, a local auction should do. Perhaps even a local dealer in antiques or timepieces. If it is a lot of money I would search for high end or fine auctions to sell it.  I have no idea what it could be worth and can’t give much more advice than that, sorry :(

gunsandposes:

Frederick V, Elector Palatine, aka the Winter King (16 August 1596 – 29 November 1632). Portrait by Gerrit von Honthorst, 1634.
(via)

gunsandposes:

Frederick V, Elector Palatine, aka the Winter King (16 August 1596 – 29 November 1632). Portrait by Gerrit von Honthorst, 1634.

(via)

ritasv:

The armor of a senior officer cuirassier, a member of the the French heavy cavalry, 1812 as displayed in the Musée de l’Armée, France

Photo taken from Art and Empire on Facebook

Sculpture depicting a shaman originating from Congo, circa 1900.

Sculpture depicting a shaman originating from Congo, circa 1900.

Incredible flintlock rifle crafted by Mollier of Paris, 1750.  Includes a hickory stock as well as gold and silver inlays and decorations.

Currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Peter the Great’s War on the Beard, Russia 1705.

One of the most celebrated Czar’s in Russian history, Peter the Great is credited with expanding and modernizing the Russian Empire.  By the late 17th and early 18th century Russia had changed little since the Middle Ages.  As Czar Peter the Great sought to reform the government, modernize the military, and enact social changes that would make the empire a more enlightened nation.

Part of his reforms included fashion as well.  Schooled in Europe during the height of the Enlightenment, Peter the Great wanted his empire to looked modernized, meaning the adoption of Western European clothing and style.  Peter himself adopted European style clothing and sported a European style mustache.  However, Russia was not so inclined to follow in his footsteps.  Peter the Great would have to drag Russia into the modern world kicking and screaming.

The strongest opponents to Peter’s reforms were the Boyars, the Russian nobles who had exerted hereditary power over the country for centuries.  The Boyars traditionally wore very long and thick beards as well as a heavy rob.  Peter hated their beards, to him the Boyar’s beards represented the old order Russia, a Russia that had to go.  

In 1705 Peter the Great issued a proclamation stating that anyone who was caught wearing a beard would be subject to a 30 ruble fine.  In order to keep a beard, a person had to pay a 100 ruble tax and carry a token which said, “The beard tax has been taken, the beard is a superfluous burden.”  Peter even went as far as creating special beard patrols who would go door to door, collecting taxes from bearded men and forcibly shaving the beards of those who refused.

The Boyars were enraged by this policy and many refused to obey the law.  So what did Peter the Great do to the Boyars who disobeyed his proclamation? Prison? Torture? Execution?  Peter had the bearded Boyars rounded up and brought before him.  One by one Peter personally cut off their beards with a large pair of sheers.   

In the end Peter the Great’s war on the beard was unsuccessful in the long run.  However he is credited with modernizing Russia while building it into a powerful empire and founding the great city of St. Petersburg.

An incredible cased, engraved, and silver decorated Confederate Baby LeMat percussion revolver.  Extremely rare.
Sold at auction: $110,000 +$23,110 buyers premium

An incredible cased, engraved, and silver decorated Confederate Baby LeMat percussion revolver.  Extremely rare.

Sold at auction: $110,000 +$23,110 buyers premium

Might I say sir that you have a quality blog.
Anonymous

Thank you

How bout some Old West saloon music!

The King Clown by Joseph Kiefer

A Bad Day for a Gunfighter,

During the days of the Old West, John Wesley Hardin was considered the meanest, most ruthless, and most dangerous outlaw of his time.  Responsible for the deaths of 27 men (although he boasted over 40), Hardin was a skilled and deadly gunfighter, so deadly that he was even able to outdraw the legendary Wild Bill Hickok on one occasion.  However, Hardin’s downfall was very uncharacteristic for the deadliest gunfighter of the Old West.  Sometimes even the best can have a bad day.

On August 24th, 1877 Texas Rangers caught up with Hardin at a train-station in Pensacola, Florida.  A team of Rangers and local police boarded the train and cautiously approached Hardin’s seat.  It took little time for Hardin to realize that the law was on to him.  As the Rangers and cops approached, Hardin immediately leaped from his seat and attempted to draw his pistol, reportedly a Smith and Wesson Schofield revolver.  A fast draw, even from the waistband of his pants, Hardin could have easily gunned down many lawmen and perhaps even make an escape.  But something unexpected happened, as he drew his revolver the hammer became entangled on his suspenders.  With the revolver helplessly tangled on his clothing Hardin was left desperately stood in the aisle of the train futilely tugging at his pistol.  Before he could yank it loose a Texas Ranger calmly approached Hardin and whacked him across the head with the butt of his pistol, causing Harden to black out.

Hardin would be extradited to Texas, where he was sentenced to 25 years at Huntsville Prison for the murder of Deputy Charles Webb.  

Bone inlaid wheel-lock pistol with Nuremberg markings, made between 1575 and 1590.  Currently on display at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

Bone inlaid wheel-lock pistol with Nuremberg markings, made between 1575 and 1590.  Currently on display at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

ancientart:

A collection of shaft-hole axeheads excavated from Iran, Luristan.

The axehead in photo 1 dates to circa 1350-1000 B.C., photo 2 circa 1350-1000 B.C., photo 3 circa 1350-1000 B.C., and photo 4 circa 2600-2350 B.C.

Courtesy the LACMA, USA. Photos from their Collections, you can check out the rest here.

Katsuya Yokoyama - Sanya Sugagaki
865 plays

crashinglybeautiful:

Katsuya Yokoyama | “Sanya Sugagaki” from Art of the Shakuhachi, 1999

An Ashanti Hunter poses with his musket, 1895. 

An Ashanti Hunter poses with his musket, 1895.