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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History
magictransistor:

Edward S. Curtis. Blackfoot. 1926. 

magictransistor:

Edward S. Curtis. Blackfoot. 1926. 

Set of double barrel over and under percussion pistols, originates from Liege, Belgium, mid 19th century.

Set of double barrel over and under percussion pistols, originates from Liege, Belgium, mid 19th century.

Gold inlaid folding trigger purse revolver with pearl grips, dated to the 1890’s.

A beautiful flintlock Pennsylvania Long Rifle crafted by John Shell of Lower Paxton Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Dated to 1817.

Sold at Auction: $6,000

A Napoleonic era political cartoon depicting Marshal Ney kissing Napoleon Bonaparte’s bum, circa 1815.

A Napoleonic era political cartoon depicting Marshal Ney kissing Napoleon Bonaparte’s bum, circa 1815.

The Madness of Dr. Semmelweis

From ancient times up to the mid 19th century there were two prevailing theories as to what caused illness.  One originated from the Ancient Greek belief in humors (body fluids) and that an imbalance of humors resulted in illness.  Another was that illness was caused by breathing miasma, or “bad air”.  In 1847 both ideas were commonly held as unquestioned fact among the medical community.  However during that year a well respected physician named Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis would challenge those ideas by coming up with a radical, nay, preposterous idea of his own. One that was so preposterous it could only have come from the mind of a lunatic.

In 1847 Dr. Semmelweis was a professor at Vienna General Hospital and director of the maternity ward.  At the time an affliction known as “puerperal fever” claimed the lives of around 10-35 percent of the women who gave birth.  Semmelweis set out to determine the reason why so many women died of this mysterious yet deadly illness, especially in his ward, which was seeing a terrible increase in the affliction.  After examining the ward and the actions of the physicians under his charge, Semmelweis noted something quite interesting.  Ironically, next to the maternity ward was the morgue.  It was quite common for physicians to conduct autopsies or anatomical studies in the morgue, then assist in childbirth in the maternity ward.  Semmelweis theorized that the physicians may be physically spreading a contaminant from the cadavers to the women giving childbirth. He did not know exactly what the contaminant was, but he was certain that this was the origin of the illness  To test his theory, Semmelweis ordered all physicians under his charge to wash their hands in a solution of chlorinated water before performing any procedure.  As a result of this intervention, death rates from puerperal fever in his hospital dropped from 10%-35% to less than 1%.

Semmelweis was so overjoyed at the results he enthusiastically published his findings in a book called Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever.  Semmelweis believed that his findings would revolutionize the way medical professionals around the world conceptualized illness and practiced medicine.  However, he immediately hit a wall when the medical community reviewed his results.  Many found his ideas bizarre and laughable, others accused him of outright quackery and fraud.  His ideas on hygiene and sanitation were quickly rejected by the medical and scientific community. Indeed there was never something so controversial and ludicrous as Semmelweis’ theory that handwashing can prevent disease.  Under pressure  from the criticism leveled at Semmelweis, the Vienna General Hospital refused to renew his term of service in 1849.  Essentially he was fired.

After continuing harassment by the Austrian medical community, Semmelweis left Austria for Hungary.  After his dismissal death rates from puerperal fever returned to their old levels.  Dr. Semmelweis was made head of obstetrics at St. Rochus Hospital in Pest, where once again his methods lowered death rates to less than 1%.  Once again his methods were ridiculed and rejected.  Then he became head of obstetrics at the University of Pest, once again, despite great successes he faced an insurmountable wall of criticism and derision.

Semmelweis spent the next decade publishing his theories and shouting to the heavens for anyone who would listen.  Over time his passionate beliefs gave him a reputation as fringe theorist, a lunatic, a man one one nut short of a fruitcake.  For the medical community of the time, the idea of “handwashing” was radical, unscientific, and even offensive.  After years of harsh criticism and rejection, Semmelweis’ mental state eventually did slip.  He sank into a deep depression and became an alcoholic. He became very reclusive, saying little and when he did converse only talking about his theories.  In his moment of weakness Semmelweis’ staunchest critics used the opportunity to attack.  In 1865 he was involuntarily committed to an insane asylum.  After suffering a beating at the hands of the orderlies, he sustained a cut on his leg.  In a cruel irony, the cut became septic after being treated by a doctor with filthy hands who sewed the wound shut with a filthy needle.  His protests of handwashing and cleanliness went unheeded as the ravings of a lunatic.  He died two weeks later.

A mere decade later the work of two scientists, Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch ultimately proved that Semmelweis was right.  Even more they discovered that the cause of most disease was from microscopic organisms called bacteria.  It was found that puerperal fever was directly caused by one species of bacteria called streptococcus pyogenes.  Today handwashing is a staple of modern medical asepsis.  In fact it is a staple other industries as well, such as childcare, food service, and many more.  It is also a sacred rule that you wash your hands after using the restroom, and before meals.  More and more common one finds anti-bacterial foams and gels in special containers all over public places such as hospitals, malls, and schools.  Today one who would advocate against handwashing would be considered a lunatic.

A pearl handled Sharps four barrel derringer, mi9d 19th century.

Estimate Value: $5,000 - $10,000

The Whitney Hooded Cylinder Revolver,

Another design created by the Whitney Company to compete with the Colt revolver was the Whitney hooded cylinder revolver.  The Whitney hooded cylinder was a six shot percussion revolver made in the style of European transitional revolvers.  Chambered for .36 caliber, the unique feature of this revolver was a brass shroud that surrounded the top of the cylinder and chamber.  The purpose of this was to create a gas seal which prevented gas from escaping from the chamber, thus creating more pressure with each shot.  While a novel idea, the Whitney hooded revolver was a bad combination of new innovation with outdated technology.  The invention of the colt made transitional revolver obsolete, as they were larger and heavier than Colt revolvers.  Worse yet, to get around Colts patents, the cylinder did not rotate when the hammer was cocked.  Rather the cylinder had to be rotated in place with each shot.  The Whitney hooded revolver was a complete flop, and only 200 were produced between 1850 and 1853.

Hunting dagger with flintlock pistol.  Originates from Germany, 18th century.

Hunting dagger with flintlock pistol.  Originates from Germany, 18th century.

humanoidhistory:

"Rifle club," photo by Leslie Jones, between 1917-1934. (Boston Public Library)

humanoidhistory:

"Rifle club," photo by Leslie Jones, between 1917-1934. (Boston Public Library)

From now on just to annoy gunblr I’m going to refer to all magazines as “clips”.

zhora-zhukov:

peashooter85:

(makes evil laugh)

Am I the only person who actually doesn’t care about this…?

Is there technically a difference? Yes… Has it been routinely ignored even by those who are well versed in forearms for the past 50+ years? Yes… Sorry people, but the battle was lost decades ago.

I don’t really care, and I don’t see why so many make such a big deal about it.

Roth-Steyr Model 1907 semi-automatic pistol

Sold at Auction: $2,300

From now on just to annoy gunblr I’m going to refer to all magazines as “clips”.

(makes evil laugh)

A gold damascened Tranter revolver crafted by Charles Nephew & Co. of Calcutta, India, circa 1865.

A gold damascened Tranter revolver crafted by Charles Nephew & Co. of Calcutta, India, circa 1865.