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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History, Historic Gun—Model 1910 FN Browning .380 Pistol...
Lock, Stock, and History
Historic Gun—Model 1910 FN Browning .380 Pistol used to assassinate Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
Gavrillo Princip was a Bosnian nationalist and member of a group of assassins known as “The Black Hand”. Hired by the Serbian government, on the 28th of June 1914, Princip used this very pistol to kill Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, as well as his wife Sophia, in the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination shook the world and by summers end the great empires of Europe were embroiled in a conflict known as “The Great War”. World War I would claim the lives of 15 million people.
The gun was given to the Jesuit Priest Father Anton Puntigam, who had given the Archduke and his wife last rites.  He intended to donate it to a museam but the pistol was lost after his death in 1926.  Amazingly, it was rediscovered 80 years later by Jesuit monks who were cleaning out a monastery’s storage basement.  Currently it is shared by the Vienna Museum of Military History in Austria, and the Royal War Museum in the UK.
Thanks go out to magyar-andrea for requesting this, I would have forgotten about June the 28th if it were not for you.

Historic Gun—Model 1910 FN Browning .380 Pistol used to assassinate Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

Gavrillo Princip was a Bosnian nationalist and member of a group of assassins known as “The Black Hand”. Hired by the Serbian government, on the 28th of June 1914, Princip used this very pistol to kill Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, as well as his wife Sophia, in the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination shook the world and by summers end the great empires of Europe were embroiled in a conflict known as “The Great War”. World War I would claim the lives of 15 million people.

The gun was given to the Jesuit Priest Father Anton Puntigam, who had given the Archduke and his wife last rites.  He intended to donate it to a museam but the pistol was lost after his death in 1926.  Amazingly, it was rediscovered 80 years later by Jesuit monks who were cleaning out a monastery’s storage basement.  Currently it is shared by the Vienna Museum of Military History in Austria, and the Royal War Museum in the UK.

Thanks go out to magyar-andrea for requesting this, I would have forgotten about June the 28th if it were not for you.