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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

The Lebel Mle. 1886 M93 R35,

Even up to the 1930’s the French Army had vast stores of Lebel rifles, an aging bolt action firearm which originated in 1886.  However the French did not merely want to sell or scrap the rifle, but put them to some use.  A common policy of the French Army in the 20th century was to hold on to weapons no made how old or obsolete they were.

In 1935 the French Army commissioned a program to shorten many older Lebel rifles in carbines for artillery units, rear echelon units, reserves, police, and colonial forces.  Conversion of the rifle to a carbine was simple, they merely shortened the barrel down to 18 inches and adjusted the length or the forward stock.  Of course this conversion came at a cost.  The Lebel did not have a box magazine but rather a tubular magazine.  Shortening it reduced its magazine capacity to only 3 rounds.  In addition, the R35 still used the aging 8mm Lebel cartridge (8x51R), even though the French Army had adopted the 7.5x54 French.  

The R35 Lebel saw limited used during World War II.  Around 50,000 conversions were produced.

Factory engraved Remington Model 8F semi automatic rifle. Manufactured in 1924.

Sold at Auction: $8,000

Rare Dumontier and Sons double barrel percussion dagger pistol.  Originates from France, mid 19th century.

Unusual .38 revolver carried by a security guard in Ecuador.

Unusual .38 revolver carried by a security guard in Ecuador.

A pair of silver inlaid flintlock pistols by John George Lacy of London, circa 1804 - 1814.
For Sale: $19,995

A pair of silver inlaid flintlock pistols by John George Lacy of London, circa 1804 - 1814.

For Sale: $19,995

A silver and gold inlaid Japanese matchlock musket, 18th or 19th century.

The Russian Cosmonaut Gun,

Starting in 1986 Russian Cosmonauts began to carry a special gun into space.  These guns were not meant to fight off space aliens and any other kind of intergalactic threat, but were meant as an emergency survival weapon.  Often Russian missions involved landing in remote areas of Siberia.  Pickup and recovery could take a while, especially if they happened to be off course. In addition if they had to abandon a space ship or station and their escape pod may land in the middle of the wilderness on some far off continent. Thus they were issued a special survival guns to fend off predators or hunt for food.

The TP-82 was a simple three barreled break open firearm that sported two calibers.  The upper two barrels were smoothbore and chambered for a special 12.5x70mm (40 gauge) shot shell ideal for hunting small game.  The bottom third barrel was rifled and chambered for 5.45x39mm rifle cartridge which was good for small game but also could be used for larger animals in a pinch.  Included with the gun was a detachable buttstock which also doubled as a sheathed machete.

The TP-82 was issued to Soviet and Russian Cosmonauts from 1982 up to 2006.  In 2007 the Russian Space Agency’s store of the rare 12.5x70mm shotshell ammunition expired in terms of shelf life.  Since then Russian Cosmonauts are issued regular semi automatic pistols with their emergency gear.

A set of gold decorated flintlock pistols crafted by Phillipe Desellier of Liege, Belgium, circa 1700.

Bizarre and unusual Bayle double action pistol.  Originates from France, mid to late 19th century.

Heavily decorated Austrian M1870/74 Gasser Montenegrin revolver.

Deactivated WWI French Chauchat Light Machine Gun,

From Rock Island Auctions:

This is a solid example of an original WWI 1915 French “Chauchat” dewat machine gun. While called a machine gun by US terms, it is actually called an automatic rifle by the French. It was one of several type of squad level machine guns used by the French throughout WWI and was even purchased by the US Government as the model 1918 which fired the 30-06 round that employed a straight stick type magazine instead of the standard curved French model magazine. It has a very unique operating mechanism in that it has a rotating bolt or bolt head during the locking and unlocking mode similar to a Johnson rifle and can be fired in both the fully automatic and semi-automatic fashion like the Browning BAR. It operates in a direct blow back manner that uses a long-recoil type mechanism, mounted on top and to the rear of the receiver itself and is feed from a large curved type magazine fitted to the bottom of the weapon. Throughout the war it never proved itself as a very reliable machine gun as the side of the magazine, the opening for the operating rod and bolt area were all exposed to dirt and debris from the battlefields, causing it to jam often and making it not a favorite of the US forces. The left side of the receiver is marked “C.S.R.G. /134971 next to a small boxed “SA” proof indicating capture or use by the Finnish Army at some point. It has a walnut stock, pistol grip and forward support handle with a fixed front sight with a fully adjustable rear sight that has been fitted with a anti-aircraft aiming circle.

An extremely unusual custom made Savage Navy revolving rifle, circa 1860.

Ornate snaphaunce musket originating from North Africa, 19th century.

Ornate snaphaunce musket originating from North Africa, 19th century.

Silver mounted miquelet pistol produced in Brescia, Italy for the Balkan market, 19th century.

Silver mounted miquelet pistol produced in Brescia, Italy for the Balkan market, 19th century.

Scarce Bergmann Model 1897 carbine.

Estimated Value: $20,000 - $40,000