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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History
A cut down Springfield Trapdoor pistol, most likely modified by Native Americans, late 19th century.

A cut down Springfield Trapdoor pistol, most likely modified by Native Americans, late 19th century.

Engraved Remington cartridge conversion pocket revolver with pear grips.
Sold at Auction: $2,250

Engraved Remington cartridge conversion pocket revolver with pear grips.

Sold at Auction: $2,250

Unidentified single shot percussion pistol/knuckleduster.  Has British proof markings, made sometime in the later half of the 19th century.

Estimated Value: $3,000 - $4,000

An ornate wheel-lock pistol decorated with steel, silver, and antler.  Made in Brunswick, Germany, circa 1560-1570.
Currently on display with the Wallace Collection in London.

An ornate wheel-lock pistol decorated with steel, silver, and antler.  Made in Brunswick, Germany, circa 1560-1570.

Currently on display with the Wallace Collection in London.

Colt percussion Model 1855 revolving military rifle with sling, mid 19th century.

Ornate ivory, brass, and silver decorated percussion pistol originating from mid 19th century Persia.

Ornate ivory, brass, and silver decorated percussion pistol originating from mid 19th century Persia.

The German MP-41,

During World War II the most popular German submachine gun of the war was the famous MP-40.  Often nicknamed the “Schmeisser” by Allied troops, the name came from Hugo Schmeisser, a German gun designer noted for his many successful submachine gun designs.  However Hugo Schmeisser had nothing to do with the design and production of the MP-40, despite popular myths.  But with the success of the MP-40 design, Schmeisser decided he wanted in on the action.

In 1941 Hugo Schmeisser introduced the MP-41, a further successor to the MP-40.  Schmeisser’s improvement of the MP-40 amounted to two main differing features.  First and foremost, the MP-41 had a solid wooden stock, whereas the MP-40 had a folding metal stock.  Finally the MP-41 had a select fire switch for semi automatic fire, whereas the MP-40 was full auto only. Everything else was the same, including the action, barrel, and magazine.

The military turned down a contract for the new submachine gun, although a number were produced for the German police.  Some were also purchased out of pocket by SS units.  Most were exported to Germany’s allies, most notably Romania, Hungary, and Bulgaria.  After only a year of production, Erma Company, holder of the MP-40 patent filed a copyright infringement suit against Haenel, which manufactured the MP-41.  Production of the MP-41 immediately halted, with only 26,700 being produced.

Ornate percussion muzzleloading target rifle crafted by Julius Grudchos and Selmar Edgars of New Bedford, Massachusetts.  Mid 19th century.

Currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Silver inlaid flintlock blunderbuss originating from Turkey, early 19th century.

Danish Madsen Model 1947 Bolt Action Rifle

Pearl handled and engraved Marlin No. 2 revolver, circa 1875.

Rare triple barreled revolving Japanese matchlock musket, Edo Period.

Rare triple barreled revolving Japanese matchlock musket, Edo Period.

Cane with hidden revolver and dagger, Germany circa 1880.

The First Auto-Cannon—-The Maxim Pom Pom Anti-Aircraft gun,

The Maxim Pom Pom, aka the QF 1 pounder is one of the first practical anti-aircraft guns and the first rapid fire auto cannon.  Created in 1890, it was originally designed to bring down observation balloons and later, during World War I, was used as an ground based countermeasure to airplanes.  Designed by Hiram Maxim the Maxim Pom Pom was named after the sound of it’s firing a deep and slow “pom, pom, pom, pom, pom” sound.  Essentially the Pom Pom was an enlarged version of the Maxim machine gun.  It fired a 1 pound, 37mm exploding shell and had a maximum range of 4,500 yards.  Before World War I the gun was used as an infantry weapon, especially by the Boers, who used Maxim-Nordenfelt built version during the Boer Wars.  However, during WWI the British rarely used the Pom Pom against infantry.  The Pom Pom saw some early successes, in 1914  Lieutenant O.F.J. Hogg became the first anti-aircraft gunner to shoot down an airplane, using an a Pom Pom to accomplish it.  However, the gun was ineffective against large targets such as zeppelins, and gradually the Pom Pom was replaced with larger guns.  Other countries, such as Germany, Belgium, and the United States also produced their own versions.

Finely engraved German single shot schuetzen target rifle by M.A. Gmeiners & Sons, late 19th century.