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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

An engraved Volcanic Arms lever action pistol with relief carved ivory grips featuring the Mexican Eagle and Serpent motiff.  Circa 1854.

Sold at Auction: $25,000

Rare US Model 1819 Hall breechloading flintlock rifle with bayonet.
Sold at Auction: $3,000
Here is a separate picture which shows how the breechloading mechanism worked.

Rare US Model 1819 Hall breechloading flintlock rifle with bayonet.

Sold at Auction: $3,000

Here is a separate picture which shows how the breechloading mechanism worked.

The Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen double-barrel revolver

Quite possibly the most unusual revolver design of all time, the  Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen double-barrel revolver (which I shall shorten to “HDH”) was a bizarre pistol that was made in Liege, Belgium from 1911 - 1928.  The HDH typically held 16 to 20 rounds, with 16 to 20 individuals chambers.  Although the hammer had two firing pins, the chambers were staggered so that the revolver would fire one round at a time.  The revolver also had two barrels, which each shot alternating between the top and bottom barrel.  The HDH was chambered in either 7.65mm, 6.5 velodog, and 6.35mm, with the smaller caliber pistols holding more shots.

The HDH revolver never really became popular, mostly because of its large unwieldy size. Even though it held a large number of rounds, its small caliber also inhibited it’s popularity. In addition, its price made it prohibitively expensive, often selling for several times the price of a regular double action revolver.  As a result few were made and sold.  Today they are collected mostly as a novelty item.

An ornate exhibition quality German pinfire revolver signed “Miller Fa Baader & Sohn in Munich”.  Mid to late 19th century.

A scarce four shot percussion turret pistol.  The cylindrical turret featured four chambers which were handloaded with powder and a bullet.  It also had four nipples for ignition percussion caps.  After firing the user would then rotate a loaded chamber into place to fire the next shot.  This example is probably of French or Belgian origin, early to mid 19th century.

Sold at Auction: $7,000

Engraved Bergmann semi-automatic pistol, late 19th century.

Currently on display at the R.W. Nortorn Art Foundation.

Deluxe and gold inlaid Steyr breechloading single shot target rifle.  Late 19th century.

Estimated Value: $8,000 - $12,000

A modern made Dutch style “Club Butt” flintlock fowling musket handcrafted by Todd Bitler.  Made and donated for the 2010 Contemporary Longrifle Association auction.

Excellent work Mr. Bitler!  Well done!

Flintlock knife pistol, maker and origin unknown, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $1,900

Flintlock knife pistol, maker and origin unknown, 18th century.

Sold at Auction: $1,900

Silver and coral mounted flintlock pistol originating from Algeria, 19th century.

Estimated Value: €3,500 – €4,500

Engraved Colt 2nd Model Derringer, mid 19th century.

A flintlock blunderbuss pistol originating from the Mediterannean, early 19th century.

A flintlock blunderbuss pistol originating from the Mediterannean, early 19th century.

19th century North African snaphaunce musket mounted with bone panels polished to look like ivory, as well as turquoise, red coral, and silver.

Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev hunting in Ukraine, 1973.

Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev hunting in Ukraine, 1973.

The Colt Model 1877 Double Action Revolver,

During the mid 19th century Colt was known for its line of single action revolvers.  However in Europe many companies and gunmakers such as Adams, Tranter, Lefaucheux, and Gasser had introduced popular double action designs.  A double action is a system by which pulling the trigger cocks and fires the gun.  This is different from a single action in which the hammer must be cocked before each shot.

In 1877 Colt introduced its first double action design.  The new Model 1877 was much like the earlier Model 1873 single action army, with the exception of a smaller frame, a redesigned grip, and of course a double action mechanism.  The M1877 came in three models, the “Lightning” which was chambered for .38 Long Colt, the “Thunderer”, which was chambered for .41 Colt, and the “Rainmaker” which was chambered for .32 Colt.

While popular, the double action mechanism of the Colt M1877 was delicate and prone to breakage.  This gave it the nickname “the gunsmiths favorite” as they needed a lot of maintenance and repair.  It was not uncommon for users to simply wear out the double action mechanism, then continue to use the revolver as a single action afterwards.  Production of the Model 1877 continued until 1909, 166,849 were produced.  Famous users included Billy the Kid, John Wesley Hardin, and the famous English detective Jerome Caminada.