">
Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

Spanish made ”Le Novo” style folding pocket revolver, late 19th century.

A Cossack’s miquelet pistol, 19th century.

A cut down Springfield Trapdoor pistol, most likely modified by Native Americans, late 19th century.

A cut down Springfield Trapdoor pistol, most likely modified by Native Americans, late 19th century.

Engraved Remington cartridge conversion pocket revolver with pear grips.
Sold at Auction: $2,250

Engraved Remington cartridge conversion pocket revolver with pear grips.

Sold at Auction: $2,250

Unidentified single shot percussion pistol/knuckleduster.  Has British proof markings, made sometime in the later half of the 19th century.

Estimated Value: $3,000 - $4,000

An ornate wheel-lock pistol decorated with steel, silver, and antler.  Made in Brunswick, Germany, circa 1560-1570.
Currently on display with the Wallace Collection in London.

An ornate wheel-lock pistol decorated with steel, silver, and antler.  Made in Brunswick, Germany, circa 1560-1570.

Currently on display with the Wallace Collection in London.

Ornate ivory, brass, and silver decorated percussion pistol originating from mid 19th century Persia.

Ornate ivory, brass, and silver decorated percussion pistol originating from mid 19th century Persia.

Pearl handled and engraved Marlin No. 2 revolver, circa 1875.

Cane with hidden revolver and dagger, Germany circa 1880.

A Persian Luger, early 20th century.  Note the Persian writing on the receiver.

A Persian Luger, early 20th century.  Note the Persian writing on the receiver.

Rare cased pocket knife/pistol by Rodgers and Crooke, late 19th century.

Gun is cocked by pulling knob hammer at rear and fired by depressing trigger lever on top of knife.

Sold at Auction: $10,782.50

A pair of silver mounted flintlock pistols by Pedro Esteva of Barcelona, Spain, mid 18th century.
Estimated Value: $4,500 - $5,500 Euro

A pair of silver mounted flintlock pistols by Pedro Esteva of Barcelona, Spain, mid 18th century.

Estimated Value: $4,500 - $5,500 Euro

Factory engraved ivory handle Colt Model 1861 revolver.

Sold at Auction: $6,612.50

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,

During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experienced Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  

The Germans didn’t simply allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.

 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own by cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.

The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.

Uniquely carved percussion pistol signed “Fr. Senfert in Jena”.  Originated from Germany, mid 19th century.

Uniquely carved percussion pistol signed “Fr. Senfert in Jena”.  Originated from Germany, mid 19th century.