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Online Counter Lock, Stock, and History
Lock, Stock, and History

The Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen double-barrel revolver

Quite possibly the most unusual revolver design of all time, the  Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen double-barrel revolver (which I shall shorten to “HDH”) was a bizarre pistol that was made in Liege, Belgium from 1911 - 1928.  The HDH typically held 16 to 20 rounds, with 16 to 20 individuals chambers.  Although the hammer had two firing pins, the chambers were staggered so that the revolver would fire one round at a time.  The revolver also had two barrels, which each shot alternating between the top and bottom barrel.  The HDH was chambered in either 7.65mm, 6.5 velodog, and 6.35mm, with the smaller caliber pistols holding more shots.

The HDH revolver never really became popular, mostly because of its large unwieldy size. Even though it held a large number of rounds, its small caliber also inhibited it’s popularity. In addition, its price made it prohibitively expensive, often selling for several times the price of a regular double action revolver.  As a result few were made and sold.  Today they are collected mostly as a novelty item.

Bizarre Japanese Folklore —- The Sazae Oni and the Stolen Testicles,

According to an old legend from Kizu Province, there was once a band of pirates sailing the high seas.  Suddenly they heard the screams of a woman, “save me, save me!” she screamed.  The pirates managed to rescue a beautiful woman just before she was about to drown.

Overjoyed with gratitude, the woman and the pirates celebrated all day and during the night the woman slept with all of the crew, including the captain.  The next morning, the pirates woke up to find that they had been robbed of their most precious treasure.  During the act of love-making, the woman had stolen all of the pirate’s testicles.

The pirates assembled on deck and confronted the woman, demanding that she return their rightful possessions.  When the pirates tried to grab the woman, she transformed into a sazae oni, a large mollusk-like creature with humanoid form.  The sazae oni warned that if the pirates came any closer, she would jump into the sea and disappear with their man-parts forever.  Then she offered them a deal, if the pirates gave her all of their pirate treasure, she would give them back their gonads.  The pirates, weighing the value of their stolen “jewels” against the jewels they had stolen, agreed to the deal.  The sazae oni returned their testicles, took all of their treasure, and disappeared into the ocean never to be seen again.

Rare engraved ten shot Noel turret revolver, originates from France, mid 19th century.

Sold at Auction: $3,500

Two shot pistol/knuckduster combo with folding blade. Maker Unknown, late 19th century. Clearly this piece is inspired by the French Apache knuckleduster.

Estimated Value: $6,500 - $9,500

Rare English flintlock pistol combined with a riding whip, 18th century.

Rare English flintlock pistol combined with a riding whip, 18th century.

Dr. Brinkley and his Miracle Goat Testicle Cure 

In 1917 Dr. John Brinkley was a factory physician employed by Swift Meatpacking Company in Milford Kansas. It was there that he observed the incredible energy and friskiness of goats before they were slaughtered. Two years later Dr. Brinkley had his own private practice and was treating a local farmer named Sttitsworth, who complained of virility and libido problems. Brinkley joked that the patient needed a ‘goat gland transplant’, at which point Sttitsworth responded, “So, Doc, put ‘em in. Transplant ‘em.” Brinkley thought to himself, “Hey, why not!” Brinkley wasn’t a real doctor. He had bought his medical degree from a diploma mill and was only qualified to practice medicine in a couple of states. Before earning his “degree”, he made his living selling quack medical cures with a traveling group of con men.

Dr. Brinkely went ahead with the procedure and implanted a piece of goat testicle into the farmer’s testicles. He charged a sum of $150 for his services. Roughly nine months later, Sttitworth’s wife had a baby and he began spreading the word of Dr. Brinkley’s miracle cure. Dr. Brinkley opened a clinic offering the treatment for both men and women for the hefty sum of $750. At the time, the yearly average family income was around $1,200. Soon he was implanting entire goat gonads into men and near the ovaries of women. Despite the high cost, his procedure became famous. His highest profile patients included the Chancellor of the University of Chicago Law School and Harry Chandler, owner of the Los Angeles Times.

At his height, Dr. Brinkley owned a mansion with a 16 acre estate, a fleet of Cadillac’s, a yacht, a private airplane, and two radio stations. He also created the National Dr. Brinkley Pharmaceutical Association which sold quack remedies to pharmacies (water with blue dye).

The problem with Dr. Brinkley’s fame was that it attracted the attention of real medical professionals. Morris Fishbein, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association, began writing numerous articles claiming that Brinkley was a quack and a fraud. In 1930, the AMA convinced the state of Kansas to pull Brinkley’s medical certification. Dr. Brinkley actually had the nerve to run for governor twice in an attempt to get it back.

In 1938, Fishbein published the book “Modern Medical Charlatans”, revealing how Dr. Brinkley’s treatment had no basis in science or medicine.  At best, the testicles would be recognized as foreign objects and absorbed into the body. Some patients even died from his implants. It was also revealed that Dr. Brinkley conducted his operations in unsanitary conditions, often while intoxicated. Brinkley sued Fishbein for libel, but lost with the jury stating, “Dr. Brinkley should be considered a charlatan and a quack in the ordinary, well-understood meaning of those words”.

The ruling opened a floodgate of lawsuits and judgments against him amounted to $3 million. The IRS began investigating him for tax evasion and the US Postal Service for mail fraud. Brinkley died in 1942, a broken and penniless man.

An engraved and pearl handled four barrel Reform pistol.  Originates from Germany, 1920’s.

The Scold’s Bridle and the Ducking Stool,

A punishment for women who were gossipers, slanderers, opinionated, loud, or who simply talked too much.  Both were popular in England, Scotland, Wales, and the English colonies during the 16th century up to the early 18th century.

Rare 7 shot Cochrane Turret Revolver, produced between 1835 and 1840.

Sold at Auction: $9,647.50

Portrait of Antonio Navagero  
Note the very conspicuous codpiece, which was a staple of men’s fashion in the 16th century.
Painted by Giovanni Batista Moroni in 1565.

Portrait of Antonio Navagero  

Note the very conspicuous codpiece, which was a staple of men’s fashion in the 16th century.

Painted by Giovanni Batista Moroni in 1565.

And you thought your job was crappy —- The Royal Bum Wiper

The Groom of the stool was a position withing the English court and one of the most intimate.  Simply put the Groom of the Stool’s duty was to manage the king’s doody.  Derived from the word “stol” meaning chair, the Groom of the Stools job was to manage the bodily functions of the king.  This was incredibly important, since at the time there was no running water or plumbing.  Tasks included disposing of the waste and keeping equipment clean.  Since in Tudor times nobles often wore heavy cumbersome clothing, the Groom of the Stool would occasionally be called upon to wipe the royal posterior.  The Groom of the Stool would also have to keep tabs on the Kings diet and the expected times of the king’s movements, so that he would always be on hand when needed. 

While it may seem a crappy job, the office was well respected and had an aura of decorum.  The Groom would was one of the few people who had private access to the king and many royal secrets were shared when managing His Highness’ poopies.  The Groom would also help in managing the kings finances, having private access to the kings accounts.

Henry the VIII had four Grooms throughout his reign, but in 1558 was transformed into the position of “The Lady of the Bedchamber”, a post dominated by women.  The reason for this was simple, the rise of Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth I to power.  With the accession of James I the post was revived, but under King Charles I the position was completely changed.  Instead of wiping the kings posterior, the new “Groom of the Stole” became a completely administrative one, with duties including managing the kings accounts, setting fiscal policy, and managing the kings schedule.  The office was finally abolished by King Edward the VII in 1901.

peashooter85:

Fun History Fact,
According to the Dead Sea Scrolls and other contemporary sources, the Ancient Babylonian King Nabonidus’ favorite pastime was to pretend that he was a goat.  This involved him ambling through the fields on all fours with other goats and eating grass. 

Some things never change…

peashooter85:

Fun History Fact,

According to the Dead Sea Scrolls and other contemporary sources, the Ancient Babylonian King Nabonidus’ favorite pastime was to pretend that he was a goat.  This involved him ambling through the fields on all fours with other goats and eating grass. 

Some things never change…

The Vought V-173 and the XF5U-1 “Flying Flapjack”,

In the 1930’s Charles Zimmerman was an aeronautical engineer with a very unorthodox idea.  As anyone who knows anything about fluid dynamics can attest, drag is often the killer of speed.  When it comes to aircraft the tips of the wings often create the most drag as it flies through the air.  Zimmerman sought to build a “low aspect” aircraft that created as little drag as possible.  His strange design, called the Vought V-173 (top 3 pictures), didn’t have normal wings like a traditional airplane.  Rather the aircraft was saucer shaped, with the entire body of the airplane acting as a wing.  The craft was also driven by two engines working two propellers.  The propellers rotated opposite of each other, creating a vortex under the wing, supplying it lift. What result was a “flying wing” with incredibly efficient aerodynamics and lift capabilities.

The brilliant new design made its first test flight in 1942.  It was then that the US Navy became interested in Zimmerman’s work.  At the time, the military was in great need of a revolutionary fighter design to help fight World War II.  The V-173 was only a prototype created to demonstrate proof of concept.  With the help of Naval engineers, Zimmerman improved and added to the V-173 design.  A strengthened, more stable frame was added as well as a stronger reinforced cockpit.  Essentially everything made made stronger and heavily armored.  Two Pratt and Whitney R-2000-7 engines were installed, each of which produced 1,350 horsepower.  Retractable landing gear was also added.  Finally there were the weapons; 6 .50 caliber machine guns or 4 20mm cannon.  In addition the new fighter could carry 2 one thousand pound bombs, or rocket pods.

Called the XF5U-1 “Flying Flapjack” (bottom 3 pictures), the new fighter exceeded all expectations.  However the new design had several kinks that needed to worked out, which delayed it’s introduction.  Unfortunately, the Vought XF5U-1 program was not completed by the end of World War II.  If the new fighter had been introduced and mass produced, it would have certainly been the deadliest fighter of the war.  With a top speed of 550 mph, it was almost as fast as the deadly German Me-262 jet fighter.  However, it was much more maneuverable, had thicker armor, carried more weapons, and with a range of 1,046 miles it could fly significantly farther than the Me-262 (652 miles).  More importantly the XF5U-1 was tough, very tough.  Engineers joked that it was so structurally solid, “it could have destroyed a wrecking ball”.

In early 1947 the US Navy canceled the Vought project.  By then the project was over budget and a number of technological issues still needed worked out.  Only two prototypes of the XF5U-1 were ever built, one of which currently resides at the Smithsonian Aviation Museum.  After World War II the US military began to study and switch over to jet aircraft, which had far greater potential than any propeller driven airplane.   A year after the cancellation of the XF5U-1, Chuck Yaeger would break the sound barrier in a rocket driven airplane.  Within the next decade, highly maneuverable supersonic fighter aircraft became a staple of modern military’s.  As amazing as the XF5U-1 flying flapjack was, its propeller driven propulsion was obsolete.

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This blog is brought to you by…

La Parle Obesity Soap

Want to lose the weight without the work of diet or exercise? Then La Parle Obesity Soap is for you!  Simply lather an rinse! Absolutly harmless, never fails to reduce flesh!  Only $2 for two bars, what a deal! Don’t hesitate, order now!

La Parle Obesity Soap, circa 1903. Adjusted for inflation $2 was the equivalent of $50 today.

Medieval Justice —- The Case of the Rooster of Basel
In 1474 a rooster living in the city of Basel, Switzerland committed one of the most shocking and heinous crimes in Medieval Swiss history; it laid an egg.  A rooster laying eggs is not only strange enough, but they were eggs that lacked a yoke. The people of Basel were terrified, for everyone knew that such eggs were not normal eggs, but the eggs of a cockatrice, a winged serpent creature with a roosters head which could kill and destroy with a mere glance.
To settle the matter, the rooster was put on trial to decide its fate.  The trial included a prosecutor, defense attorney, and judge.  The prosecutor argued that the rooster was no ordinary cock, but a minion of Satan. The defense attorney argued that the egg laying of the rooster was an odd, but natural occurrence that was no fault of the rooster.  
At the end of the trial, the judge found the rooster guilty of witchcraft.  The rooster was immediately burned at the stake.

Medieval Justice —- The Case of the Rooster of Basel

In 1474 a rooster living in the city of Basel, Switzerland committed one of the most shocking and heinous crimes in Medieval Swiss history; it laid an egg.  A rooster laying eggs is not only strange enough, but they were eggs that lacked a yoke. The people of Basel were terrified, for everyone knew that such eggs were not normal eggs, but the eggs of a cockatrice, a winged serpent creature with a roosters head which could kill and destroy with a mere glance.

To settle the matter, the rooster was put on trial to decide its fate.  The trial included a prosecutor, defense attorney, and judge.  The prosecutor argued that the rooster was no ordinary cock, but a minion of Satan. The defense attorney argued that the egg laying of the rooster was an odd, but natural occurrence that was no fault of the rooster.  

At the end of the trial, the judge found the rooster guilty of witchcraft.  The rooster was immediately burned at the stake.